Graphic design, like coding, is another skill that few are experts in. Website builders feature templates with modern styles and visually appealing designs that are tried and true. While they may follow a certain “look,” they often conform to the desires of contemporary web users. They also convey a level of professionalism that may be difficult to reproduce without a large investment.
Hello Christopher, Users can save your website to their desktop by going into their internet browser (e.g. Chrome), navigating to settings and then manually creating a desktop icon that they can use. This process typically uses the website 'Favicon' as the default image for the desktop icon. Your favicon is the small image that appears in the tab next to your web page title at the top of a browser. For example, Wix's is a small version of the Wix logo, Gmail has a red and white envelope, while our site has a tiny WBE logo in a navy circle. You may need to do some research into how you can change your website's favicon, but if you do then this is how you can have a degree of control over how the desktop icon looks. I hgope that makes sense? - Tom
Weebly is one of the pioneers in creating HTML5 based websites and templates. It's an entirely online website builder with lots of goodies for designers. Its designs are immaculate and its features are mind-blowing. Every template and website design created using Weebly is compatible with mobile devices and works smoothly on all major platforms. You can create websites with Weebly using either your own domain name or a Weebly subdomain.
Hello Kate, Based on your comment, that doesn't sound right at all! Did you give you a very detailed and sensible reason of why they are requesting the $700? Normally, domain names cost about $12 - $15 to renew on an annual basis. You can see more discussions about domain names that we've put together here. You should definitely demand a reasonable and detailed explanation. Good luck with that. Jeremy
Wix is one of the best free website builders out there. Its hundreds of HTML templates are extremely user-friendly and reliant on the software’s drag-and-drop interface, which makes building a website a similar experience to crafting a PowerPoint presentation. While Wix offers more flexibility in terms of customization over other website builders, the unbridled freedom also makes it easier to create lackluster designs if you don’t know what you’re doing.
About.me and Flavors.me are examples of nameplate services. You simply upload one big photograph as the background for your personal webpage, then artfully overlay information and links to create your digital nameplate. These free sites help you pull images from your social networks or from a hard drive, then provide the tools to make the text and links work unobtrusively, though it really behooves you to check out other personal pages for an idea of what works.

"We needed a simple web site creation tool. We needed to quickly and easily get an attractive web site. We needed to do all of this without having to work through a “developer.” And, since 1995, I and millions of others have been living in frustration, because that tool has never, ever existed. Never. This tool is the holy grail, a flying unicorn… the loch ness monster… rare and amazing, and something nobody has ever actually seen."
Graduates are prepared for entry-level positions in Web design and development. Potential employers for Web design program graduates include specialized design firms (e.g. Web design firms), advertising agencies, publishers, computer systems design firms, and Fortune 500 companies. A Certificate in Web Design from Sessions College will prepare you to apply your skills to these types of careers:
Hi Gertrudes, I think if you want to build a simpler website, then Squarespace, Weebly and Wix are good candidates for you to test and see which one suits you better. Weebly has the lowest learning curve, then Wix and Squarespace. But from a design perspective, I think Squarespace will give you the most professional and beautiful looking website. All of them are mobile device friendly and so your visitors will be able to find more information about your website through their mobile devices. I think the best way forward is to sign up for them for free, then invest some time to play around with their tools and see for yourself which one you prefer. It's a very personal choice when it comes to which builder interface you prefer, so investing a bit of time in testing them out is well worth it. - Jeremy
The Webmaster - HTML and CSS Course is a beginner’s course, designed for students who are interested in starting a career as a Web Designer or who simply want to build their own personal or a company / organisational website. The course is designed as a thorough introduction to the HTML and CSS web development tools, and shows our students how to build a high-impact landing page with a stunning photo gallery, optimised for the popular search engine search algorithms and responsive to the browser screen size. During the course, our students will also build a contact page and their own store front, using some compelling animation, transition, and transformation techniques to attract their visitors. On successful completion of the course, students will receive the Distance Learning Centre Webmaster Diploma with feedback and analysis of your completed work, as well as an Open Awards Quality Endorsed Unit Course Certificate.
However, your presentation of Comparative Web Builders was absolutely, totally and altogether superb! It was the essence of distilled intelligence, of simplifying a complex mess, of bringing flawless order out of scuzzy chaos. I congratulate you on possessing an unusual and unique skill and talent. I am a writer and inventor, and nothing turns me on intellectually more than seeing someone do what you did! Your work is stunning.
They don’t sugar-coat it: in their view “learning to code requires a lot of hard work. You can’t learn by osmosis, you have to build. You have to bang your head against problems and work your way out.” In other words, these structured learning programs are not for the faint-hearted, but aimed squarely at highly-motivated students who are determined to carve out a career in web design and development. Courses are full time and start at $7,500 for eight months’ instruction.
If you are building a business related website, and have a smaller budget, using builders such as Wix, Squarespace, Weebly, SITE123 or Jimdo can definitely help you maintain financial discipline, and also allow you to create and update your own website in a very short period of time – no need to call / email your website developer and wait for small updates as you can now make them yourself. Additionally, with the time you save, you can focus on other more important aspects of running your business.
Excellent article! After surfing the Internet and reading many websites on how to create a website, I can honestly say that it is the most complete and easy to understand, for a complete beginner! Your step by step guide is comprehensive and very informative and has given me the confidence to move forward and try to set up my own commercial website ... A big thank you!
Have just started to use their e-commerce features and agree they are awesome. By comparison I have just built an e-commerce site using BigCommerce and it has been a chore using their site builder. Also have a Shopify site on standby, but I think Weebly will end up being my site of choice, mainly because the guys listen and make every effort to accommodate the users.

All these website builders are good as long as you are content with their templates. I recently found another website builder when I needed to build a website from scratch. TemplateToaster is the software which lets me build themes from scratch on many CMS including WordPress, Magento etc. I think you should also give it a try so that you can about it when a question on flexibility of design arises. Thanks for the wonderful article anyways.


As a new up and coming web designer what is your opinion on the best software to use where I will be able design websites effectively and then pass it onto a client. My preference was to use Adobe Muse to allow for a freedom of design. However lots of people suggest WordPress and Dreamweaver both of which are not favourites of mine as WordPress is not as creatively flexible and Dreamweaver and coding is a struggle for myself. What is your opinion on Muse and is it a software that is suitable for this kind of work as a web designer where I will be giving the client the reigns of the website once I have completed it?
There are currently more than 500 courses in web design and web development to choose from, largely focused on beginner to intermediate levels, and taking in everything from PHP and React to more nuanced topics like ‘Moodboards for web designers’. So unless you’re looking for something very niche or advanced, you’re likely to find the exact training you’re looking for. 

Blogs are swell, but sometimes you need a simple place to park your persona on the internet for branding purposes. In this case, you can just get a nameplate site, or as we prefer to think of them, a personal webpage (rather than a multipage site). Instead of linking internally to your store or other pages of note as you would with a more traditional web page, a personal site usually has links that go elsewhere—to your social networks, wish lists, playlists, or whatever else is linkable.


If you want an easier option, that does exist. WordPress.com is an externally hosted version of the software, meaning you can create an account online, upload what you’d like to site, and publish it immediately. No downloads, no learning curve. It still offers a good amount of customization, and it’s available without the need for any kind of coding knowledge.
This is a good place to learn about web design, but not the best place to learn about responsive or dynamic websites. That fact is clear from the fact their website is slightly lacking in smooth dynamic or responsive design. Still, it is a good place to find free course that are amended by other people on the Internet. It is peer powered, which does mean you get the occasional error, but also means you learn a few tips and tricks that are not widely known on the Internet yet, so you have to take the rough with the smooth.
our Company has a website that is built using Umbraco. All computer guys say this is a really great platform however as a user (with no code capabilities) we find it stiff and limiting. Our developers have set up a few fonts, a few templates but I am missing the variations that WYSIWYG software provide. We are tempeted to scrap our Umbraco site and start. We do not need a complicated website with tons of pages but like lots of Pictures, vivid photos, a few sound files, news feed and so on.

Hello Vivy, If you are a beginner and don't want to climb a steep curve to learn the technicalities of managing a hosting company, then consider taking a look at drag & drop website builders. These website builders manage all the hosting and technical aspects of operating a website for you. And, their platform allow you to drag and drop your content when making your pages so you don't have to know how to code. I'd suggest testing out Wix and Weebly to start. Both are code free and have free plans for you to test. They don't have a time limit on their free plans so don't worry about upgrading until you are satisfied with them. But if you really want to use a hosting company (for instance, you want to use WordPress.org), then someone like Bluehost is pretty good, in general. Thanks, Jeremy
I used to use Microsoft’s FrontPage to do my web design stuff to make it easier for my family and I to keep in touch when I was stationed overseas. I liked FrontPage because it did it all for me. I’d design the page like I was using Word or Publisher, stick in my pictures, and FrontPage would make sure everything matched. Layout, colors, fonts, graphics, etc. Then I’d just hit a button and FrontPage would ship everything to my web server.
While people are getting acquainted with new technologies and learning web design in a faster manner, others are using online tools to create a simple website without coding knowledge. While I come across many web design software in the market that allow you to simply drag-and-drop and rearrange the elements to make a website, the old-fashioned web design process still rules the web.

Thanks. If you mean if you can link up your domain names with the website builders, then yes, that can be done. Each web builder will have their own specific instructions on how to do this. But the basic idea is to log into your GoDaddy account under Domain Management, then change the DNS (domain name server, which is an IP address) and point it to the specific website builder that you are using.


Thank you so much – your evaluations will save my artist group members so much time and frustration. Wix and Weebly were my short list too. I recommended Weebly to them last year, as most members are not tech-literate and Weebly seemed the least frustrating for a first timer. Also, fewer and simpler templates were a plus in this case, rather than a problem. I will have another look at Wix now to see if the issues I had in my test site have been fixed. I agree with your comment on the Weebly statistics (e.g. it counted my edit tweeks as hits) and the constant upsell ads. As noted here by others, Weebly’s support by phone or online chat are excellent. I will have another look at Wix now and see if that might work better for us now that more members have some online experience. Thank you again for your excellent and well-written research.
A domain name is the bit of the URL (the long address in your browser’s search bar) that identifies a web page — in this case your website. You can register them separately at sites like GoDaddy and Namecheap, but website builders offer to do it for you when you sign up with them. Most provide it for free (at least initially), while a handful charge a few extra bucks.
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